UNESCO Hunt #12 : Prambanan Temple, Indonesia

 

UNESCO #642 Says: 

“This is the largest temple compound dedicated to Shiva in Indonesia. Rising above the centre of the last of these concentric squares are the 3 temples decorated with reliefs illustrating the epic Ramayana, dedicated to the 3 great Hindu divinities.”

Following a dress code. 

Most of the temple grounds are in ruins due to the harsh sun and rain over centuries and this can be seen around as you walk in the compound. Before entering, we were asked to wear the ‘sarong batik’ as a sign of respect for the heritage site. So best to wear a t-shirt as you’ll be able to cover the bottom part with the sarong. If you’re not sure how to tie the sarong, a guide will help you. By the way there is an entrance fee for this place which is USD 18 per person, but if you plan on going to both Borobudur and Prambanan, there’s a combined fee of $30 if not mistaken. You’ll also need a guide to go with you in the complex, who will be explaining the stories of Prambanan.

My friend SS getting her sarong tied before we enter the complex.

My friend SS getting her sarong tied before we enter the complex.

 

Don’t rely heavily on the guide though.

Our guide didn’t really say much about this history, preferring to help snap photos of us as a group wherever we went. All he mentioned was that the complex is built with inner squares, similar to the ancient Angkor Wat Temple. The name Prambanan came from a nearby village, where the temple is located. There are a few parts to this compound with different stupas. Most of them have the similar formation; wide base with a pointed top towards the sky. We entered one temple where a statue of an ox sat, facing the outdoors. In another temple we were asked to wear safety helmets because a restoration was taking place. We only managed to enter for a few minutes and then left before it got crowded.

Getting to know the Prambanan Complex with our guide.

Getting to know the Prambanan Complex with our guide.

The view from one of the top of the stupas.

The view from one of the top of the stupas.

Looking up we saw similar formation for most of the temples here.

Looking up we saw similar formation for most of the temples here.

 

Take the mini-train ride if it’s too much of a walk. 

There’s also a mini-train ride that takes you around the area giving you a 360 degrees view of the Prambanan Complex. Some people got off halfway to walk around the compound taking more photos while we continued until the end of the journey, got off and went into the souvenirs section (where else would we go after that?). The complex is worth a visit if you love history but I would suggest to do a little reading so that you would know the background of the site. If not you would end like us, not really knowing what went on here (while we were here).

Taking the mini train around the Prambanan Complex since it's such a hot day.

Taking the mini train around the Prambanan Complex since it’s such a hot day.

 

Information:

Opening Hours: 7:30am-5:30pm daily | Entrance Tickets: USD$18 for Prambanan only | How to get there: Take the TransJogja bus (1A) from Malioboro street (Rp 3, 600 one way)

About Yafieda Jamil

A Malaysian girl currently working abroad in Phnom Penh city. I love a good road trip, hot cappuccinos, spicy food and staring at old buildings. My mission is to inspire people to see the world differently before we all get any older. Oh and giraffes are the most beautiful creatures on earth.

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