UNESCO #15 : Stonehenge, UK

 

UNESCO Site #373 says:

“Stonehenge and Avebury, in Wiltshire, are among the most famous groups of megaliths in the world. The two sanctuaries consist of circles of menhirs arranged in a pattern whose astronomical significance is still being explored. These holy places and the nearby Neolithic sites are an incomparable testimony to prehistoric times.

Rock on.

Stonehenge was built 5,000 years ago as a prehistoric site to bury the deceased. The circle is made of large and smaller stones bringing it to 83 stones in total. Over the years there have been debates on what the stones stand for with some saying that it is related to an astronomical observatory to mark the winter solstice. Whatever the reason, one thing was agreed on and that was the stones were built to align with the rising and the setting of the sun.

The long queue to see the stones.

The long queue to see the stones.

The Stonehenge is made of larger and smaller stones.

The Stonehenge is made of larger and smaller stones.

 

My take on the Stonehenge visit.

We did a road trip here before heading on to Bath with our designated driver for the day. It was a two hours drive with changing sceneries from the city to a landscape of green. From the highway we could already see vehicles going slowly to catch a glimpse of the Stonehenge, including us. We queued to the parking lot and then walked over to the entrance to get the tickets for the whole family.

From there we had two options of either taking the bus tour or walking around 1km to the site. We chose to take the bus and waved at those who decided to walk instead. When we got to the center, there was already a large crowd making their way to the inner circle, stopping at a few of the stones for a photo op. We did the same but made sure not to block other tourists who were walking on the same path.

The compound is relatively large and you could decide whether to take the right or left path to circle the entire Stonehenge. We took the right and walked down all the way to other end for the whole view of this icon. There were rules to the walk and no one could go inside the marked area due to preservation reasons.

To our surprise, a guy walked inside the marked area, ran towards the stones, touched it and ran out again. Suddenly 2 guards in plainclothes ran to him and pinned the guy down. They then asked him to walk back to the entrance and leave the area immediately. That was the only exciting thing in Stonehenge beside the stones themselves. If you’re into astronomy and maths, this place might fascinate you. Otherwise, we go just to appreciate its existence and wonder whether there is anything else underneath those stones.

Another part of the Stonehenge.

Another part of the Stonehenge.

This is as close as I could get to the stones.

This is as close as I could get to the stones.

 

Information:

Location: Amesbury, Wiltshire SP4 7DE | Opening Hours: 9am-8pm daily | Entrance Tickets: £14.50 (adult)£8.70 (child),£5 (parking entrance),£2 (audio guide) | How to get there: Stonehenge Tour Bus, train to Salisbury 9 ½ miles or drive and exit at A350 Airman’s Corner.

About Yafieda Jamil

A Malaysian girl currently working abroad in Phnom Penh city. I love a good road trip, hot cappuccinos, spicy food and staring at old buildings. My mission is to inspire people to see the world differently before we all get any older. Oh and giraffes are the most beautiful creatures on earth.

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